The Tamar Regional Council, situated at the southern end of the Dead Sea, the lowest place on earth, sits on an area of 420+ thousand acres with 6 separate communities occupying the land: Kibbutz Ein Gedi, Moshav Neot HaKikar, Moshav Ein Tamar, Moshav Ein Hatzeva and Kibbutz Har Armasa and Neve Zohar which is a small village in the centre of the region and houses the regional council offices.

The main focus of the regional council is the provision of services to the population and the preservation of the main natural wonder – the Dead Sea.

The Dead Sea is one of the most beautiful attractions in Israel and the world. The Dead Sea and the Judean desert encompasses a unique blend of dramatic landscape, historical and archaeological sites, mineral industry, advanced agriculture farming and exceptional tourism.

Currently 15 hotels with 5000 beds sit on the shores of the Dead Sea with another 3 hotels to be built over the next few years.  The Dead Sea Works (one of the largest industries in Israel) occupies a large area at the southern end of the Dead Sea. The kibbutzim and moshavim have large agricultural farms for vegetables and date plantations.

In 2016 the Tamar Council together with Tel Aviv University opened the Dead Sea Research Institute situated at the base of the famous heritage site; Masada.  See attached profile of the Institute.

In addition to providing all the necessary services to the 1,350 residents in the area the council also maintains services to the two million tourists who visit the area each year and to the industrial factories in the vicinity.

Dov Litvinoff, Mayor, is a member of Kibbutz Ein Gedi. He has been the mayor of Tamar Regional Council since 2004. Previously he managed the local Community Centre and the Dead Sea tourism. Recently, the council celebrated its 60th birthday. Tamar - a Date (fruit) – was chosen as the name due to the bountiful dates plantations cultivated in the region.